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TECH ARTICLES, VEHICLE FEATURES, EVENT COVERAGE & MORE

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Turbo cars are kind of like superheroes. They’re mild mannered, quiet and basically invisible to the public. But with a little prodding, they spin up fast and then the competition gets their shit wrecked. Growing up in Colorado, Matt Frost wasn’t a superhero. But thanks to his dad introducing him to fast cars at an early age, Matt started down the road to owning his current ride, a street-driven, 6-second-capable twin-turbo ’67 Nova.

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Toyota takes a 2015 Camry, does a delicious bait and switch and plops a 600-horsepower, 5.7-liter V-8 under the hood of the very inconspicuous looking car.

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When we received an invitation to attend a private Old School meet, sponsored by SNTRL and Nostalgia Imports in Edgewater, New Jersey, we jumped at the chance. Many heavily modified imports competed for our attention, but we managed to focus on a vehicle that represents one of our future series highlighting the Japanese Domestic Market (JDM) scene in America. While there was no shortage of premium imports, one classy 1983 KE70 Toyota Corolla seemed the perfect specimen.

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The term "bolt-on" has become a ubiquitous term among car enthusiasts, and is something Matt Owen has literally no understanding of. At the young age of 28, and the lead fabricator at T1 Race Development out of Rockwall, TX, Matt has had the privilege of building some of the fastest R35 Nissan GT-Rs in the world. That being said, he’s had his dream car in mind for a few years now, and it could not be any less impressive than the cars he works on every day.

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We thought Myles might have been just another basic Honda fan. He talked of owning several Acura Integras over the years, drives a beat up old Civic with over 200,000 miles on it and had the audacity to think those "wrong wheel drive, torqueless wonders" could be competitive in many forms of motorsport. Myles has indeed had the nerve to use his Integras in road racing, autocross and drag racing. Boasting high horsepower numbers, while conveniently omitting torque numbers, all while trying to outrun/outrace vastly superior cars was clearly part of the basic Honda fanboy delusion that Myles was consumed by.