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TECH ARTICLES, VEHICLE FEATURES, EVENT COVERAGE & MORE

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Welcome to our second installment of our Scene Theory series. This time we dive into what it means to be JDM in America. The acronym JDM has become more than a three letter abbreviation; it's become a lifestyle, a scene, a brand and a way of expression. On the most basic level, JDM refers to the "Japanese domestic market"⎯the heavyweight of the import scene. Honda, Subaru, Nissan, Mitsubishi and Toyota⎯all of these manufacturers are of the JDM variety.

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The term "bolt-on" has become a ubiquitous term among car enthusiasts, and is something Matt Owen has literally no understanding of. At the young age of 28, and the lead fabricator at T1 Race Development out of Rockwall, TX, Matt has had the privilege of building some of the fastest R35 Nissan GT-Rs in the world. That being said, he’s had his dream car in mind for a few years now, and it could not be any less impressive than the cars he works on every day.

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Those who are new to the automotive scene may think the cleanest of cars are created only by master builders and enthusiasts working in the automotive field. If you’re one of those people, then our good friend and San Francisco native, John Delaughter, will prove you wrong with his backyard-built, daily-driven 1973 Toyota Celica. John’s heart for classic Japanese domestic market (JDM) automobiles has led him to visit Japan four times, learn Japanese, and create one of the most legitimate of builds. It’s a build that doesn’t just show-off an affinity for style and speed, but a true love of the Modified Lifestyle.

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When we first contacted Nico, we knew he was a special person. Not only is he the owner of one of the sharpest G35s we have seen to date, but he also embodies the modified lifestyle we promote at Revvolution. He understands that more is involved than just building a car that you’re proud of; it’s connecting with the community and building relationships that last a lifetime.

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The import versus domestic car argument can get quite heated. The domestic guys tend to boast about their power and quarter-mile times, while the import crowd brings up turning left—and right—and things go downhill from there, but what about a compromise? Why not combine the best of both worlds—agility from the import side with brute force from the domestic camp? That was the question Alexander Gallardo had to ask himself when he came to a crossroads with the evolution of his 2003 350Z a few years ago.