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TECH ARTICLES, VEHICLE FEATURES, EVENT COVERAGE & MORE

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Those who are new to the automotive scene may think the cleanest of cars are created only by master builders and enthusiasts working in the automotive field. If you’re one of those people, then our good friend and San Francisco native, John Delaughter, will prove you wrong with his backyard-built, daily-driven 1973 Toyota Celica. John’s heart for classic Japanese domestic market (JDM) automobiles has led him to visit Japan four times, learn Japanese, and create one of the most legitimate of builds. It’s a build that doesn’t just show-off an affinity for style and speed, but a true love of the Modified Lifestyle.

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Every week this build gets more and more interesting as we dive deeper into the inner workings of the BRZ. For this installment, we peel back the layers of the engine to understand what we have to work with, and where it can be improved in relation to our initial build objectives. As with any good build, you define an objective based on what you have to work with. In order to properly understand what we had to work with first hand, it was necessary that we dive into the platform’s heart. This time, we turned to SCR Performance because of their intimate knowledge of Subaru drivetrains, as well as their reputation as top engine builders. We knew they would give an accurate assessment of what areas we’d need to address as the build progresses.

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Toyota recently created quite a bit of excitement with the unveiling of their FT-1 concept. It was a concept car, like any concept, designed to inject new life and vigor into the brand, and by all accounts, it has been a huge success by doing just that. Many of us assumed it to be the next generation of the Supra, which holds a special place in the heart of all of us who fell in love with the great Japanese sports cars of the 1990’s. Toyota has confirmed those assumptions, and announced that it will in fact be the new Supra.

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Last week, we dove into the strengths and weaknesses of the performance components on the Subaru BRZ / Scion FR-S platform. What we found out, in short, was that the platform is well balanced in its stock form, and designed and executed to work in mechanical harmony. Even with it as well balanced as it is, we're finding that the engineers have left much on the table–on purpose. Our goal here is to unwrap the platform to its most basic level, assessing and documenting what we find along the way. Then build upon the strengths of the platform so we can achieve our goals and deliver the information we uncover back to the enthusiasts. Until we start swapping out parts and cursing bruised knuckles, we're going to take a less technical look at the platform's electronics, aesthetics and trim.

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Welcome to the fourth installment of our Subaru BRZ / Scion FR-S platform review. So far, we’ve gone over the platform as a whole, and provided our initial impressions with our BRZ project car. Now, we start to pick the car apart in greater detail as we address the strengths and weaknesses of the various components that make this platform what it is. We’ll take our analysis to a greater level of detail with our upcoming documentary series revolving around our BRZ build, but we used the following generalized data points to help guide the direction of the Revvolution BRZ.